Tag Archives: assisted living

Old-School Nursing Homes vs. Today’s Assisted Living Communities

While there are still some of the old-school nursing homes out there, there are a lot more new-school senior living communities that have populated the market, since the birth of the “senior industry” 30 years ago. 

The old-school nursing homes usually operate solely on revenue from Medicaid (the US government) and don’t have sufficient funds to make improvements, so they simply have not kept up with the changing market. Whereas, most of the new communities are private pay (by the residents) and do not accept Medicaid, so they operate more profitably, which allows them to make investments and improvements to serve their community and residents and remain competitive.

Over the past five years, there’s been an explosive growth of brand-new senior living communities developed by large established senior living owner/developer/operator companies as well as investors that have jumped into the senior housing industry. They’re all anticipating that the tsunami of Boomers turning 65 each year will want or need senior housing and care.


The properties just keep getting better and more impressive as the developers strive to meet consumer desires and to stay ahead of competitors, but it’s always important to research the owner/operator and interior designer. Consider everything when selecting senior living, not just price.

Established companies usually have their heart in it and are experienced. They know what works and what doesn’t. They know where they need to spend money and provide resources.

Investors’ priorities may be different, or they may be inexperienced and not have a handle on day-to-day operations, which can be disruptive for residents and their families, and cost them more which causes unanticipated rent increases. They’re also more apt to forgo hiring a professional senior living interior designer either because they don’t know any better or because they want to avoid the expense.

Senior living properties that have not been designed by a professional senior living interior designer put residents at risk with life-safety issues that are preventable.

Sadly, I come across this more than I should, and it makes me cringe. For example, recently I visited a brand-new large, senior living community with independent living, assisted living and memory care. I inquired, as I always do, as to who the developer and designer were. I was told that the developer was a local investor and their secretary did the design. Yikes! That is flat out scary and dangerous!

Assisted living and Memory Care are healthcare. Senior living, memory care and healthcare design are highly specialized and based on science and art. Design for seniors at every level of care requires that highly specialized design, which is a lot more than looking pretty. So, I will never recommend that community, despite that it looked nice. But only people that ask or are trained designers will know because it’s not visible to the untrained eye. The moral of the story is: Don’t judge a book solely by its cover, do your homework.  

Three Ways You Can Avoid Old-School Nursing Homes

  1. Be financially prepared to self-pay.
  2. Purchase a Long-Term Care insurance policy and make sure that it will cover home care as well as memory care, so that you’re fully protected.
  3. Hire a qualified Aging in Place design professional now and have your home and/or bathroom designed and remodeled for aging in place, so that it prevents falls and accidents and will enable you to stay in your home through active adult years and beyond, if you prefer. 55+ TLC also makes it beautiful and increases the home’s value, making it a wise investment.

I strongly recommended Long-Term Care insurance. Recent statistics indicate that 4 out of 5 people over 65 will need long-term care in their lifetime, and you’ll likely need it for 3 to 10 years. Most people aren’t financially prepared for that. LTC insurance can serve as a life preserver.

© 2019 55+ TLC Interior Design, LLC. All rights reserved.



Private Family Dining Room Renovation Makes Big Impact at Senior Living Community

Progressive, dedicated senior living communities (independent living, assisted living and memory care) continually look for ways to improve resident experience and inspire family members to visit their loved ones. Up-to-date aesthetics, private family dining rooms, new amenities like movie theaters, spas, and salons, and activities, dining and culinary experiences, health and wellness programs, and greater levels of care are among the most popular.

Why Private Family Dining Rooms?

Many senior living communities offer a separate, private family dining room for residents to host private family gatherings they otherwise may not be able to due to space limitations in their apartments. Typically, senior living apartments are 600 to 800 square feet, but can be as small as 350 sf or as large as 1,800 sf.

Senior living apartments are intentionally designed and built small to encourage residents to spend their time out in the common areas socializing, dining, participating in activities, and taking advantage of the community’s amenities, rather than staying cooped up and isolated in their apartments. Smaller apartments also tend to be more manageable and easier to navigate, particularly as mobility decreases or with cognitive decline.

The common living areas and apartments in senior living communities are usually designed by senior living architects and designers, which make them safer than houses and/or bathrooms. Although, single-family houses can be rectified for safety through design and remodel by a qualified Aging in Place design professional.

Design Matters So Much More for Adults 55+

McDowell Village Senior Living is a nice, lively, active community in Scottsdale, Arizona. It has 205 independent and assisted living apartments with approximately 300 residents ranging in age from 70 to 100+. The McDowell Village management team had noticed for some time that their private family dining room was not being used much, so renovation became a priority.

With a mission to keep residents happy, active and engaged, and not have underutilized space, the renovation objective was to update the existing dark, heavy, traditional style décor and furniture in favor of a more casual, contemporary and inviting room that would be more appealing to residents and their adult children. One that would be frequently used for family gatherings, meals and parties.

As their senior living interior designer, the challenge was to not only create a casual, comfortable contemporary space that would be used more, but one that would also integrate well with the traditional style adjacent spaces that were not being renovated at that time.

In redesigning the private family dining room, the opportunity was seized to make the room more walker and wheelchair accessible, fully ADA-compliant, and more senior-friendly (easier to use and safer) via colors, furniture size and layout, lighting, and the flooring material.

The renovation design included new lighting fixtures and proper positioning of them, which required moving some electrical, new flooring that was more durable and cleanable, new furniture and artwork, wallpaper removal, and fresh paint in new colors.  


Benefits for Residents, Visitors, Staff and Management

Private Family Dining Room Feature Wall

The renovated private dining room has been a big hit with residents and visitors, as well as staff and management. The room is now in high demand. It’s being used as intended for family gatherings, meals and parties, and even more. Resident groups are meeting there. Some of the ladies are beading and making jewelry together while other residents are getting together to play cards, despite that there are other areas in the building to do these activities. Even staff meetings are taking place there. Each is a testament to the room’s warm, casual appeal. Exactly what was desired and needed.

Whether occupied or unoccupied, the renovated private family dining room design gracefully conveys a sense of home. Even to prospective residents touring the community.